Biosphere 2: Reserach Past and Present

This special issue represents the most comprehensive assemblage yet of findings from Biosphere 2, that were subjected to a strong peer-review process. Topics range from calibrated models that describe the system metabolism, hydrologic balance, and heat and humidity, to rainforest, mangrove, ocean and agronomic system development.

William Mitsch, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of
Ecological Engineering

From the Elsevier Catalogue:

“Biosphere 2, the fascinating 1.25-ha and up to 190 000 m3 atmosphere glass-enclosed mesocosm in the Arizona desert, explores the bounds and frontiers of the new field of ecological engineering.

This project set out to construct ecosystems or biomes, not monocultures, in a heavily subsidized environment, save for the sun, 50% of which did penetrate the glass, and the soil that was trucked in. Pumps were needed for the hydrologic cycle, blowers for atmospheric movement, and even a 165 000 m3 ‘lung’ to relieve the pressure that builds up in the glass enclosed system. More than 10 MW of electrical power generating capacity stands nearby. Ecosystems did flourish in the various biomes, never turning out exactly as they had been planned, but always giving information that provides insight on their true analogs in nature. CO2 concentrations soared and O2 concentrations dipped during those first years, showing us the importance of plants, microbes, soil carbon, and even building concrete on the system’s biogeochemistry.

This publication represents the most comprehensive assemblage of findings from Biosphere 2, findings that were subjected to a strong peer-review process. The papers range from calibrated models that describe the system metabolism, hydrologic balance, and heat and humidity, to papers that describe rainforest, mangrove, ocean, and agronomic system development in this CO2 -rich environment.

The ecological message is clear – we should appreciate and try to understand the workings of the ecosystems and the Biosphere that we have. Biosphere 2 helps us do that in many ways.”

Contents:

Preface. (W.J. Mitsch)

Editorial. Biosphere 2: introduction and research progress (B.D.V. Marino, H.T. Odum)

Overview and Design. Biospherics and Biosphere 2, Mission One (1991-1993) (J. Allen, M. Nelson)

Biosphere 2 engineering design (W.F. Dempster).

Construction and engineering of a created environment: overview of the Biosphere 2 closed system (B. Zabel et al.)

Research Articles. Tropical rainforest biome of Biosphere 2: structure, composition and results of the first 2 years of operation (L. Leigh et al.).

Characteristics of soils in the tropical rainforest biome of Biosphere 2 after 3 years (H.J. Scott)

Simulations of community metabolism and atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen concentrations in Biosphere 2 (V.C. Engel, H.T. Odum).

Litterfall and decomposition rates in Biosphere 2 terrestrial biomes (short communication) (M. Nelson)
The Biosphere 2 coral reef biome (M.J. Atkinson et al.)
Mangrove ecosystem development in Biosphere 2 (short communication)
(M. Finn et al.)

Soils in the agricultural area of Biosphere 2 (1991-1993)
(S.E. Silverstone et al.).

Bioregenerative recycling of wastewater in Biosphere 2 using a constructed wetland: two year results (short communication)
(M. Nelson et al.).

The agricultural biome of Biosphere 2: structure, composition and function (B.D.V. Marino et al.).

The daily carbon cycle of the Biosphere 2 ocean (C. Sweeney)
High quality, continuous measurements of CO2 in Biosphere 2 to access whole mesocosm carbon cycling (Y. Rosenthal et al.)
Ecosystem-level evapotranspiration and water-use efficiency in the desert biome of Biosphere 2 (F.N. Tubiello et al.).

Growing wheat in Biosphere 2 under elevated CO2: observations and modeling (F.N. Tubiello et al.).

Dynamics of the global water cycle of Biosphere 2 (F.N. Tubiello et al.)

Simulation of the water cycle in Biosphere 2 (D. Kang).

The Biosphere 2 canopy access system (short communication) (M. Grushka et al.)
Multispectral imaging of vegetation at Biosphere 2 (short communication) (B.D.V. Marino et al.)

Simulation of heat and humidity budgets of Biosphere 2 without its air conditioning. (A. Nebot et al.).

 

Publication

Edited by 

Edited by
B.D.V. Marino,
Department of Earth and Planetary Science,
Harvard University, Oxford St, Cambridge, Mass, USA
&
H.T. Odum,
Environmental Engineering Sciences,
University of Florida, Gainesville, USA

ISBN: 0-08-043208-5
330 pages HARDBOUND
Price: US $98.00
Published by Elsevier
June 1999
TO ORDER: Click here
www.elsevier.com

ISBN

ISBN: 0-08-043208-5
330 pages HARDBOUND
Price: US $98.00
Published by Elsevier
June 1999
TO ORDER: Click here
www.elsevier.com